Tag Archives: NFL

Hiring lessons from Andrew Luck, Peyton Manning and Tim Tebow – Forbes

For those of you (like me) who follow the NFL, it’s been a wild roller coaster ride the last couple of weeks, not least of which is the drama around Peyton Manning becoming the newest Denver Bronco. And, as a Hoosier, I’m right in the middle of the action.

There’s a lesson here about employees and teams. Entrepreneurs must always be vigilant in making sure they have the right management team in place for their particular situation, stage of growth and future prospects. The saga of Peyton Manning is a perfect example.

Via www.forbes.com

Subway sponsors mobile game to attract Super Bowl viewers

Why should your listeners download your station’s app?  What purpose does it serve?

Case in point:  Subway is sponsoring the PrePlay football game application to engage sports fans during the Super Bowl XLVI.   The PrePlay app awards points to fans who predict the outcome of each play as they watch football games on television. The Subway brand is incorporated throughout the app.

Via www.mobilemarketer.com

No Surprise, Disney Gets Database Marketing Right (Too)

Last night, Tara & I took our son and his cousin to see Disney’s “Toy Story on Ice” at Conseco Fieldhouse (yes, instead of watching the NFL Championship games).  I bought tickets online a few weeks ago, received them by mail in time, and had no problems.  This morning I received a thank you email for attending the show from Feld Entertainment, the show’s producer.  Kudos!

The email was short and to the point:  “I’d like to thank you for attending … We value you as a customer and hope you had a magical time.  We know you have several choices when selecting family entertainment, and we appreciate your patronage.”  Signed, Kenneth Feld, CEO.

Obviously, this is was automatically sent by a mail-bot.  But, it caught me off-guard and was a pleasant surprise this morning.  Now, I’ve spent a majority of my life in the radio business.  I don’t think I’ve bought tickets for anything other than a game since … Continue reading

Get Rid of the Crappy Stuff

Mark Ramsey is one of my favorite people to follow on Twitter (@markramseymedia); not only does he blog with great insight about the media business, he also consistently links to fantastic articles from various disciplines.  Today, he turned me on to a great article by Carmine Gallo at FastCompany.com:  “Steve Jobs’s Strategy? Get Rid of the Crappy Stuff” (click here to read article).

This article is an excerpt from The Innovation Secrets of Steve Jobs, recounting advice Jobs gave new Nike CEO Mark Parker:  “Nike makes some of the best products in the world.  Products that you lust after.  Absolutely beautiful, stunning products.  But, you also make a lot of crap.  Just get rid of the crappy stuff and focus on the good stuff.”  Parker’s response was simply, “He was absolutely right.  We have to edit.”  In the context of Parker’s speech to the 2010 Innovation Uncensored conference, “edit” was used to address business decisions and focus on a smaller product line that can receive the full resources of a company rather than a wide array of products that become neglected.

The same business principal can be easily applied to the way we program a radio station, build a website, and produce a morning show.  Edit is a term we understand.  Edit is a term hammered into our brains from thousands of aircheck critiques.  Edit is something we program directors yell at the radio far too often.  It’s easier not to edit.  It’s even easier to lose focus and edit poorly.  PPM is forcing radio to re-learn this most basic and valuable skill … and learn when not to edit

Yes, it’s easy to improve ratings if we: Continue reading

Location-based Radio Promotion

Image representing Foursquare Solutions as dep...

Image via CrunchBase

Location-based marketing is the newest social media buzzword for GPS-based check-in networks like Foursquare, Gowalla, & Yelp.  Foursquare is still in its infancy – even with just over one million registered users – enough to receive most of the hype, which will only get louder now that Facebook has jumped into the game with Facebook Places.  These services aren’t for everyone, and the security problems they create are getting just as much attention as their popularity.  But, I assure you location based marketing is not going away; in fact, it will become a standard part of retail’s marketing mix very quickly.  Consumers are turning to their mobile devices more and more everyday to make purchase decisions, making location based marketing incentives a natural for retail.  Case in point:  Scotty’s Brewhouse in my hometown owns three of the top ten check-in venues thanks to their rewards plan for loyal customers who participate.

What can WE do to integrate location based marketing into our social media strategies?  How does radio use Foursquare when we don’t really have a “location” for checking in?  For that matter, what about television and bands?  There must be something we can do!  Click through for my ideas you can start using today! Continue reading

NFL “Role Model” for your Radio Cluster

Last night, I sent a tweet @scottsands during the NFL pre-game show on NBC.  Around 7:30pm, during the height of entertainment between Taylor Swift and Dave Matthews Band performances, I saw perhaps a network television first … NBC gave promotional airtime to direct competitors CBS, FOX, and ESPN.

NBC tossed to CBS Sports, who promoted their first television game this weekend, who then tossed to FOX and then on to ESPN to plug Monday Night Football.  This took a lot of courage for NBC to allow.  Of course, the pre-game show was produced by the NFL Network on behalf of the NFL (which has the most to gain from using the season kick-off to promote all the league’s upcoming games).  But, at some point, NBC would have needed to agree to this negotiation point. 

But, in the end, all the networks win from the increased consumer interest in all the games.  So, let’s put this in perspective for our radio programmers … Continue reading


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